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Resources by Topic >> Government

General Resources

DC Department of Youth Rehabilitation Services
450 H ST NW, Washington, DC 20001
(202) 299-5362 (voice) | (202) 299-560 (fax) | (746) 777-7776 (TTY)
dyrs@dc.gov

DC’s cabinet-level juvenile justice agency, administering detention, commitment, and after-care services for youth held under its care in its facilities or residing in the DC community.

DC Department on Disability Services
250 E Street, SW, Washington, DC 20024
202-730-1700 (voice) | (202) 730-1843 (fax) | (202) 730-1516 (TTY)
dds@dc.gov

The DC Department on Disability Services (DDS) provides the residents of DC with information, oversight, and coordination of services for people with disabilities and those who support them, such as service providers and employers. DDS has two Administrations ( Rehabilitation Services Administration & Developmental Disabilities Administration ) that oversee and coordinate services for residents with disabilities through a network of private and non-profit providers.

REHABILITATION SERVICES ADMINISTRATION (RSA) - focuses on employment, ensuring that persons with disabilities achieve a greater quality of life by obtaining and sustaining employment, economic self-sufficiency and independence. RSA’s program is designed to assess, plan, develop, and provide vocational rehabilitation services for individuals with disabilities, consistent with their strengths, resources, priorities, concerns, abilities, capabilities, and informed choice, in order to prepare for and engage in gainful employment 34 C.F.R. § 361.1

  • The RSA Youth in Transition Services Units provide transition services, as defined by the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 amended, to coordinate a set of activities for students designed around an outcome-oriented process that supports their movement from school to post-school activities including post-secondary education, vocational training, integrated employment (including supported employment), continuing and adult education, and independent living. Vocational rehabilitation transition services link students with disabilities, while still in school, with the vocational rehabilitation program to create a continuum of services leading to long-term employment outcomes for eligible students.
  • To learn more about RSA’s vocational rehabilitation process for youth with disabilities, refer to the RSA Youth in Transition Toolkit: “Explore the World of Work, Discover Your Career”. It provides the specific steps and activities that youth, schools, and parents need to understand to apply for services and work through the RSA process to receive services and find employment.

DEVELOPMENTAL DISABILITIES ADMINISTRATION (DDA) - public agency responsible for the oversight and coordination of all services and supports provided to qualified persons with intellectual disabilities in the District of Columbia.

  • DDA supports individuals with intellectual disabilities to have the most independence and choice and control over their own lives through person-centered service planning and delivery and increased provider capacity. DDA coordinates home and community services for over 2,000 individuals so each person can live and work in the neighborhood of his or her choosing, and promotes health, wellness and a high quality of life through service coordination and monitoring, clinical supports, and a robust quality management program.

DC Department of Employment Services
4058 Minnesota AVE NE, Washington, DC 20019
202-724-7000 (voice)
does@dc.gov

The Department of Employment Services (DOES) provides a wide variety of services to job seekers through its One-Stop Career Centers. A vocational rehabilitation counselor who works for the Rehabilitation Services Administration (RSA) is also available at the One-Stop Career Centers. Please note that in order to receive services from an Employment Specialist at the One-Stop Career Center, job seekers must complete an assessment that includes a reading test. Residents who test below an eighth grade reading level will be referred to other agencies for assistance.

DC Office on Aging
500 K ST NE, Washington, DC 20002
(202) 727-6603 (voice)
deborah.royster@dc.gov

The DC Office on Aging develops and carries out a comprehensive and coordinated system of health, education, employment, and social services for the District's elderly population, who are 60 years of age and older.  The Office on Aging was created by DC Law 1-24 in 1975 as the District's State and Area Agency on Aging. It is structured to carry out advocacy, leadership, management, program, and fiscal responsibilities. On the program level, the Office on Aging oversees the operation of two on-site programs, the Information and Assistance Center and the Senior Employment and Training Program. In addition, DCOA also provides nursing home care and services to District residents 18 years of age and older. Currently, the DCOA/District owns two nursing facilities that are privately operated and managed. The Washington Center for Aging Services (WCAS), is leased to Stoddard Baptist Home Foundation and Unique Residential Care Facility is leased to Vital Management Team (VMT). It also funds a Senior Service Network comprising 20 community-based nonprofit organizations that provide direct services to the District's elderly citizens.

DC Board of Elections & Ethnics' iVotronic Voting Machine
441 4th Street NW Suite 250 North , Washington, DC 20001
(202) 727-2525 (voice) | (202) 347-2648 (fax) | (202) 639-8916 (TTY)
director@dcboee.org

The DC Board of Elections & Ethnics' iVotronic voting machine allows voters to cast their ballots using touch screen or audio controls. Click here to learn more .

DC Board of Elections & Ethnics
441 4th Street, NW, Suite 250 North, Washington , DC 20001
(202) 727-2525 (voice) | (202) 347-2648 (fax) | (202) 639-8916 (TTY)
director@dcboee.org

The DC Board of Elections & Ethics provides information about:

  • Voter Registration
  • Voter Populations
  • Elections
  • Candidates
  • Regulation Changes
  • Board Meetings and Political Events

The ABLE National Resource Center (ANRC)
1667 K Street, NW Suite 640, Washington, DC 20006
(202) 296-2040 (voice)
info@ablenrc.org

The ABLE National Resource Center (ANRC) is a collaborative that brings together the investment, support and resources of some of the country's largest and most influential national disability organizations in an effort to accelerate the design and availability of ABLE accounts to meet the needs of individuals with disabilities and their families. Founded and managed by National Disability Institute (NDI), the ANRC's goal is to provide consistent, reliable information concerning the benefits of an ABLE account. In addition, the ANRC aims to educate individuals with disabilities and their families, state government and legislatures, financial service companies and financial planners and attorneys - who focus on trust and estate planning - about ABLE’s potential positive impact on the lives of millions of Americans with disabilities.

American Youth Policy Forum
1836 Jefferson Place NW, Washington, DC 20036
(202) 775-9731 (voice) | (202) 775-9733 (fax)
aypf@aypf.org

AYPF’s mission is to broaden the awareness and understanding of policymakers and to strengthen the youth policy-making process by bridging policy, practice, and research. We do this by identifying the most pertinent high-quality information on youth issues available and providing a forum for prominent leaders in government, programming, and research, as well as the youth themselves, to share their viewpoints and expertise about the policies and practices that improve outcomes for all youth.

ASAN's Home and Community-Based Services Advocates Toolkit
PO Box 66122 , Washington, DC 20035
info@autisticadvocacy.org

ASAN has published a toolkit for advocates, families and administrators on how to ensure that people with disabilities receive Medicaid-funded Home and Community-Based Services in integrated settings that offer full access to the community.

ASAN’s new toolkit includes:

  • A Resource for Advocates and their Families explaining what the new rule means and how to make their voices heard as their states make plans to comply with the new rule. The resource includes scripts for writing to state Medicaid agencies about how they’d like their state’s HCBS program to change.
  • A Resource for State Administrators and Professionals on how to come into compliance with the new rule. This resource includes detailed guidance on the implications of the new rule, suggestions for elements to be included in the transition plan, and examples of useful tools and questionnaires for assessing provider compliance.
  • A Research Brief explaining how scattered-site supported housing can help states meet the integration and choice standards in the New Rule.
  • A Fact Sheet on integrated housing for people with disabilities.

Business Opportunity Workforce Development Center
2311 Martin Luther King Jr. Ave, SE, Washington, DC 20020
202-645-8620  (voice) | 202-645-0366 (fax)

Through the financial support of the US Department of Transportation Federal Highway Administration, DDOT administers two federal programs aimed to fulfill its mission to help small business entrepreneurs successfully compete for procurement contracts in transportation construction. 

Business Resource Center Washington, DC

The Business Resource Center (BRC) is an online clearinghouse for the District's business community. Common tasks associated with doing business—such as paying taxes, obtaining business license information, and registering a business trade name—can be performed from this central location.

DC Department of Healthcare Finance
899 N. Capitol St, NE, 6039, Washington, DC 20002
202-442-5988  (voice) | (202) 442-4790 fax | 711 (TTY)
dhcf@dc.gov

DCHF programs include Medicaid, DC Healthy Family, and The DC Healthcare Alliance. The DC Healthcare Alliance offers a full range of health care services for its members. Benefits include: inpatient hospital care, outpatient medical care (including preventive care), emergency services, urgent care services, prescription drugs, rehabilitative services, home health care, dental services, specialty care, and wellness programs.

DC Healthy Families
6856 Eastern Avenue NW Suite 206, Washington, DC 20012
(202) 639-4030 (voice)

DC Healthy Families is a part of the Medicaid program that makes getting good health care easy. DC Healthy Families provides free health insurance to families with children and women who are pregnant. You don't have to have a job to get free health care. You don't have to get TANF (temporary assistance for needy families) and you don't have to be a US citizen.

DC Special Education Co-operative
1488 Newton Street, NW #2, Washington , DC 20010
202.232.2288 (voice) | 202.450.3571 (fax)
info@specialedcoop.org

The DC Special Education Co-operative facilitates the development of high -quality, compliant special education programs. These programs promote disability awareness, literacy, and increased accountability among local education agencies (LEAs). The Co-op also provides various support services, including:

  • Program or curriculum consultation
  • Workforce development training
  • Medicaid funding application assistance

Department of Housing and Urban Development District of Columbia Field Office
820 1st St, NE, Suite 300, Washington, DC 20002
202-275-9200 (voice) | 202-275-6381 (fax) | 202-275-6388 (TTY)

Housing discrimination based on your race, color, national origin, religion, sex, family status, or disability is illegal by federal law. If you have been trying to buy or rent a home or apartment and you believe your rights have been violated, you can file a fair housing complaint.

Disability.gov

Disability.gov connects people with disabilities, their families, and the organizations that support them to important information about:
  • Disability benefits (guides, programs, applications, etc.)
  • Civil rights (ADA information, accessibility guidelines, employment rights, complaint procedures, etc.)
  • Community life (history of the independent living movement, personal care assistance services, sports and leisure activities, etc.)
  • Education (IDEA and IEP information, teaching materials and strategies, classroom supports, college prep, etc.)
  • Emergency preparedness (inclusive emergency planning, disaster recovery assistance, emergency service accessibility, etc.)
  • Employment (career planning, workforce development, internship programs, hiring and recruiting information, etc.)
  • Health care (disability and condition information, services and providers, caregiving options, financial assistance, etc.)
  • Housing (housing laws, home buying guides, supportive housing options, home modification, etc.)
  • Technology (accessible technology guidelines and standards, assistive information technology, assistive educational technology, financial assistance, etc.)
  • Transportation (laws, travel guides, providers, vehicle modification, safety and complaint procedures, etc.)

Disabled American Veterans (DAV)

We are dedicated to a single purpose: empowering veterans to lead high-quality lives with respect and dignity. We accomplish this by ensuring that veterans and their families can access the full range of benefits available to them; fighting for the interests of America’s injured heroes on Capitol Hill; and educating the public about the great sacrifices and needs of veterans transitioning back to civilian life.

  • Providing free, professional assistance to veterans and their families in obtaining benefits and services earned through military service and provided by the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) and other agencies of government.
  • Providing outreach concerning its program services to the American people generally, and to disabled veterans and their families specifically.
  • Representing the interests of disabled veterans, their families, their widowed spouses and their orphans before Congress, the White House and the Judicial Branch, as well as state and local government.
  • Extending DAV’s mission of hope into the communities where these veterans and their families live through a network of state-level Departments and local chapters.
  • Providing a structure through which disabled veterans can express their compassion for their fellow veterans through a variety of volunteer programs.

Disabled Veterans National Foundation (DVNF)
(202) 737-0522 (voice)
info@dvnf.org

The Disabled Veterans National Foundation exists to provide critically needed support to disabled and at-risk veterans who leave the military wounded—physically or psychologically—after defending our safety and our freedom.

We achieve this mission by:

  • Providing an online resource database that allows veterans to navigate the complex process of seeking benefits that they are entitled to as a result of their military service, as well as additional resources they need.
  • Offering direct financial support to veteran organizations that address the unique needs of veterans, and whose missions align with that of DVNF.
  • Providing supplemental assistance to homeless and low-income veterans through the Health & Comfort program and various empowerment resources.
  • Serving as a thought leader on critical policy issues within the veteran community, and educating the public accordingly.

District of Columbia Housing Authority
1133 N. Capitol St, NE, Washington, DC 20002
202-535-1000 (voice)

The District of Columbia Housing Authority (DCHA) manages subsidized housing programs, with a separate waiting list for each program. These housing programs are: 1) Public Housing, 2) Housing Choice Voucher-Tenant based Vouchers, 3) Housing Choice Voucher-Moderate Rehabilitation, and 4) Project Based Vouchers. Rental assistance is provided to low-income teens, young adults, and families through each housing program, and the assistance is based on household income. For complete details on these housing programs and renting assistance, contact the DCHA office.

DMH Access Help Line
1-888-7WE-HELP (voice) | 1 (888) 793-4357 | 202-727-3363 (TTY)

The DMH Access Help Line is the best way to access mental health rehabilitation services and its certified mental health service providers. Mental health professionals staff this 24-hour telephone line. Call the Access Help Line to: Get help with solving problems, share concerns, obtain emergency services, and decide whether to seek mental health or other types of services.

Entering the World of Work: A Guide to Employment Programs for Adults with Disabilities in Alexandria, Arlington, Fairfax & Falls Church

This guide, written by the Arc of Northern Virginia, covers the following key issues:

  • When to start preparing for entry into the workforce.
  • What you need to know to prepare for and stay on the job.
  • Whether working will affect your child’s benefits.
  • Which steps to take now to protect your loved one’s financial future.
  • How he or she will get around.

How Social Security Disability and Medicare Benefits Work Together

This Plan Prescriber article discusses the following topics:

  • Who qualifies for Medicare Disability?
  • Who is automatically enrolled in Medicare Part A and Part B?
  • Who needs to enroll manually for Medicare Disability?
  • How to apply manually for Medicare Disability

Jenny Hatch Justice Project
202-448-1448 (voice)
JHJP@dcqualitytrust.org

Sponsored by Quality Trust for Individuals with Disabilities, The Jenny Hatch Justice Project (JHJP) supports the right of individuals with intellectual or developmental disabilities to make decisions about their lives. JHJP provides access to:

  • Recent research publications on independent living services and alternatives to guardianship
  • Informative brochures on decision-making
  • A sample training program
  • Legal, educational, and transition resources

M&L Special Needs Resources Webpage
5603 Potomac Ave. NW, Washington, DC 20016
855.344.9771 (voice) | 855.344.9771
info@specialneedsplanning.net

At M&L Special Needs Planning, we feel that access to the right information is the key to planning a successful future. In keeping with our goal to keep you informed, and to provide you with the tools to enable you to plan a happy and successful future for your family, we have compiled a list of special needs resources.

Office of Disability Rights
441 4th St, NW, Suite 729N, Washington, DC 20001
202-724-5055 (voice) | 202-727-3363 (TTY)
mathew.mccollough@dc.gov

The mission of the DC Office of Disability Rights (ODR) is to ensure that DC programs are fully accessible to people with disabilities. ODR is committed to inclusion, community-based services, and self-determination for people with disabilities. ODR is responsible for making sure that the DC government satisfies the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) and other disability rights laws. ODR (1) looks into discrimination complaints and other issues made by community members, (2) provides ADA training and other help to DC agencies to ensure that all people with disabilities are treated with respect and integrity, and (3) works with community members and government partners to ensure that people with disabilities have opportunities to become productive citizens within their communities with appropriate supports.

Office of Disability Rights Braille Services Interpretation Program
441 4th St, NW, Suite 729N, Washington, DC 20001
odr@dc.gov

It is important that people who are blind or have low vision be able to benefit from DC government services when printed materials are the only means of communication available. District government must provide a mechanism for individuals who are blind or have low vision to request official documents from agencies and to advise them that they need to provide 5-7 business days' notice.

OSSE
1050 First Street NE, Washington, DC 20002
(202) 727-6436 (voice)
osse@dc.gov

Sets statewide policies, provides resources and support, and exercises accountability for ALL public education in DC.

Project Search

Project SEARCH is dedicated to providing education and training to young adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities through an innovative workforce and career development model that benefits the individual, workplace, and community. Our primary goal is to secure competitive employment outcomes for each of our student graduates

Securing a Future for Your Child with a Disability: A Parents Guide to Adult Services in Alexandria, Arlington, Fairfax and Falls Church

This guide, written by the Arc of Northern Virginia, will help you answer the following questions:

  • Who’s in charge of key life decisions.
  • Whether your adult child is eligible for government support.
  • What kind of jobs and day support programs are available.
  • Which recreational activities are best.
  • How he or she will get around.
  • Where they’ll live.

Serve DC
2000 14th ST NW Suite 101, Washington, DC 20009
202-727-7925 (voice) | 202-727-9198 (fax)
serve@dc.gov

Serve DC – The Mayor’s Office on Volunteerism encourages people with disabilities to participate as National Service members in the District of Columbia. A priority of the Corporation for National and Community Service and Serve DC is the full and proactive inclusion of individuals with disabilities in service. Under federal law, National Service program sites that include AmeriCorps, Learn and Serve, and Senior Corps are required to comply with the requirements of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) and Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act. In addition, National Service program sites must make reasonable accommodations to enable a qualified applicant or National Service participant with a disability to participate in the application process or to perform essential service functions. Serve DC currently has funding available for any National Service program site operating in the District of Columbia to provide reasonable accommodations for persons with disabilities who are applicants or current National Service members. National Service program sites must apply for the funding.

The Social Security Administration
1-800-772-1213 (voice)

The Social Security Administration is responsible for two major programs that provide benefits or money based on disability: Supplemental Security Income (SSI) and Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI).

The Social Security Administration, Anacostia
2041 Martin Luther King Jr. Ave, SE, Suite 130, Washington, DC 20020
202-755-0672 (voice) | 202-673-5168 (fax)

The Social Security Administration is responsible for two major programs that provide benefits or money based on disability: Supplemental Security Income (SSI) and Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI).

The Social Security Administration, M Street Office
2100 M St, NW, Washington, DC 20037
202-653-5040 (voice) | 202-233-2012 (fax)

The Social Security Administration is responsible for two major programs that provide benefits or money based on disability: Supplemental Security Income (SSI) and Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI).

The Social Security Administration, Postal Plaza (Brentwood)
1905-B 9th St, NE, Washington, DC 20018
202-376-5049 (voice) | 202-755-0630 (fax)

The Social Security Administration is responsible for two major programs that provide benefits or money based on disability: Supplemental Security Income (SSI) and Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI).

The Social Security Administration, Shepard Park
7820 Eastern Ave, NW, Washington, DC 20012
202-673-5159 (voice)

The Social Security Administration is responsible for two major programs that provide benefits or money based on disability: Supplemental Security Income (SSI) and Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI).

SSA Benefits For People With Disabilities

The Social Security Administration (SSA)’s Benefits for People with Disabilities webpage:

  • Provides overviews of available programs and services
  • Outlines benefit eligibility requirements
  • Offers application and appeals assistance
  • Addresses frequently asked questions

Student Veterans of America
1625 K Street NW, Suite 320 , Washington , DC 20006
(202) 223-4710 (voice)

Student Veterans of America envisions a nation where all student veterans succeed in post-secondary programs and contribute to civilian society in meaningful ways. SVA provides the resources and support to do so through five major initiatives. We maintain a commitment to Support Chapters through leadership training, grants, and networking opportunities that facilitate the development of successful student-run organizations. An essential component of chapter work is advocating for supportive campus services and programs. At the national level, SVA’s Advocacy efforts ensure policies are not only supportive for veterans in their transition to school and employment, but also for the entire military community. To best serve this large community, SVA Develops Partnerships with other organizations to provide scholarships, mentorships, employment, and benefits counseling. Yet, our support doesn’t end at graduation. Student Veterans of America is developing a networking program that will Connect Alumni veterans with even more professional opportunities. These initiatives are designed to bring veterans closer to their degrees, yet little data exists on student veterans' academic performance. By Investing in Research, SVA hopes to fill that void and showcase student veteran success.

Summer Youth Employment Program
4058 Minnesota AVE NE, Washington, DC 20019
(202) 724-7000 (voice)

Provides an array of summer enrichment experiences in a range of industries. This short-term employment and training program provides thousands of District youth, ages 14-21, with an opportunity to gain practical experience and be compensated. Youth participants are paid the federal minimum wage.

Title VIII: Fair Housing and Equal Opportunity

This HUD.gov webpage:

  • Summarizes the purpose and history of the The Fair Housing Act
  • Summarizes HUD's role in administering The Fair Housing Act
  • Highlights significant, recent changes made to the Fair Housing Act
  • Provides an overview of the Fair Housing Assistance Program (FHAP)
  • Specifies regulations for HUD employees and contractors

U.S. International Council on Disabilities
1012 14th St. NW, Suite 105, Washington, DC 20005
(202) 347-0102 (voice) | (202) 347-0351 (fax)
info@usicd.org

The U.S. International Council on Disabilities (USICD) is a non-profit that promotes the inclusion of disability perspectives in U.S. foreign policy and aid and provides opportunities for domestic disability rights organizations to interface with their international counterparts.


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